Join hundreds of people in Dunfermline this summer for the annual St Margaret Pilgrimage.

It takes place on Sunday 23 June and sees the return of the popular procession through the city centre led by Archbishop Leo Cushley.

He said: "St Margaret's influence and legacy is extraordinary and much of her work was done in the historic capital of Dunfermline.

"Her virtue and holiness helped transform not just her own family but the life of the nation for the next thousand years.

"So I invite you to join us as a pilgrim on Sunday 23 June as we process with her holy relic up through the High Street to St Margaret's Memorial Church where we will celebrate Holy Mass in her honour."

The procession will gather at the Louise Carnegie on Bridge Street (opposite the Seven Kings Pub) at 2:00pm.

Earlier in the day there will be an outdoor prayer service at the tomb of St Margaret at the historic Dunfermline Abbey, led by Archbishop Cushley (12:30pm).

Why not spend the day in Dunfermline and take advantage of what the historic city has to offer? You can enjoy a wander around Abbot House and its gardens, visit Andrews Carnegie's Birthplace Museum and enjoy the beauty of Pittencrieff Park (known locally as 'The Glen'). See dunfermline.com

We recommend that pilgrims visit St Margaret's Cave, and descend the atmospheric 87 steps where St Margaret prayed over 900 years ago.

Schedule

  • 12:30pm: Ecumenical Prayers at tomb of St Margaret at Dunfermline Abbey.
  • 2:00pm: Procession from Pittencrieff Park (Louise Carnegie Gates, Bridge Street, opposite Seven Kings Pub) to St Margaret's Memorial Church, East Port, Dunfermline.
  • 3:00pm: Mass celebrated by Archbishop Cushley and blessing from relic of St Margaret.

History

The roots of the summer pilgrimage date back to June 1250 when the relics of Saint Margaret were translated to a new shrine in Dunfermline Abbey following her canonisation by Pope Innocent IV.

A pilgrimage to Dunfermline soon emerged and continued until the late 16th Century. It was then resurrected in 1899 and continued again until 1974.

Archbishop Cushley revived it in 2015 and it has continued since then, except a hiatus due to the pandemic.